Fearlessness doesn’t come naturally to me.  I cracked living creatively despite it.
If I should let in pessimism & fear now; if I nurtured and entertained them, they may still have the ability to take over my life like unwanted, non-paying lodgers!  Like carrying their weight on my back.

Change seeps in around you 

Today I liked this post [from @sauravrungta], particularly this bit:

“To resist change is like resisting the current, which makes your life very hard. Sometimes, resistance can also put you in a situation where you are paddling against the current and trying to go upstream, which is just worse.”

It really got me thinking about how I have the child-like quality of being so un-switched on to change that it seeps in around me and before I know it, it’s happened.  I remembered I wasn’t always this way!
I know a lot of people who resist change.
They are anxious, frightened people who fear the worst & expect the worst.

It seems easier to stay in the known moment than to move into the unknown.

They resist.
But like @sauravrungta says, this takes a WHOLE lot of energy & leaves little room for growth and creativity.

I was rudely awakened to the concept of death by age 3 1/2 when my father died of a brain hemorrhage aged 31.
I was a TREMENDOUSLY fearful child.  I slept with my arms crossed over my chest, my teeth clenched, expecting to be stabbed from above or below and any number of perils my mind could muster.
Fear still had the capability of visiting with me well into my 40s [when my homeopath gave me a remedy 3 years ago that made me far more trusting! I was 50 this year.]

Crack how to live with it

I cracked how to live despite it before I resolved it.

As a teen, I recognized what a prison I was in and I freed myself.
I read Frank Herbert’s Dune!  The books contain a litany which I began to say to myself when I was afraid.  I taught myself to be brave by practicing turning toward the thing I fear [as long as I judge it not foolish to do so!].

“I must not fear.
Fear is the mind-killer.
Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
I will face my fear.
I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
Where the fear has gone there will be nothing.
Only I will remain.”

If I was terrified someone/thing was behind me, I stopped in my tracks, literally turned round and stood still where previously I had run.  I ‘turned the inner eye to see its path’ and noticed I was calm.
I was encouraged onward by the calmness it brought and the freedom and strength I felt.

Default a YES!

I turned my default ‘NO!’ into a default ‘YES!’  Unless I had good, sound reason to avoid something, I refused to.
I work with a lot of anxious people [I’m a homeopath] and something I find useful to deal with inertia is building a habit of ‘changing your default’.   You have to build the habit and you have to maintain the habit with ‘habit hygiene’.  Don’t slip back for long to your old default.

Beware which wolf you feed
I remind myself:

If I should let in pessimism & fear now; if I nurtured and entertained them, they may still have the ability to take over my life like unwanted, non-paying lodgers!  Like carrying their weight on my back.

A doable action: It takes about 21 days …

It takes about 21 days to form a new habit and to break an old one [I tested it.  It’s sound :-)].

Replace your default ‘no’ with a default ‘yes’.  

Your decision is ‘yes’ and you have to give yourself good grounds to answer ‘no’.

I will face my fear.

[Hey!  I have a pathological inertia about doing anything I’m told to do … so I have to be sure it’s me making this decision and I’m fully committed to my new ‘yes’ habit.]

A default ‘Yes’ can change a lot more than fear & inertia.

It’s the same principle I used as a parent to become more responsive to my children’s needs & supportive of their liberty & equality:  I changed my default answer from ‘no’ to ‘yes’.  It’s a very positive way forward, and it became a wonderfully liberating habit. [Taking Children Seriously]

Take it easy – Baby Steps

It can be done in baby steps, getting stronger and braver daily.
The key thing is to OWN the problem.
No one else [and nothing] did it to you.
No one else is coming to change it for you.
To crack your ‘no’ habit, you have to want it.
It takes some bravery and commitment & some self-belief.

Piggy-Backing New Habits. 

The way to remember to practice a new habit for those 21 days is to add one new habit at a time and to piggy-back it onto something that is already a fixed habit you have.  Do it at the same time as the habitual thing.